thefinalact

Oct 01

[video]

Sep 30

If you obsess over whether you are making the right decision, you are basically assuming that the universe will reward you for one thing and punish you for another.

The universe has no fixed agenda. Once you make any decision, it works around that decision. There is no right or wrong, only a series of possibilities that shift with each thought, feeling, and action that you experience.

” — Deepak Chopra

(via diamond-mouth)

daniela-kocianova:

❗️❗️❗️ #regram @modelburnbook (at London Fashion Week)

daniela-kocianova:

❗️❗️❗️ #regram @modelburnbook (at London Fashion Week)

Sep 29

[video]

[video]

“The problems of the mentally ill have challenged both society and physicians for centuries. In times past their odd behaviour often associated with insanity was interpreted as the result of demonic possession. It could also, sometimes, be a source of public amusement. To control their behaviour the insane were often manacled. This appalling state of affairs is well illustrated in this work by Goya (1746–1828). He was not the first or last to depict the institutionalized insane (for example, Hogarth’s Bethlem Hospital in 1735 and Chepik’s The Madhouse in 1987), but Goya’s work certainty evoked the suffering and torment of these individuals. Interestingly, Goya had been taken seriously ill in 1792 at the age of 47 with loss of balance, difficulty in walking, partial blindness and deafness. It has been suggested that this could have been a viral-induced Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada syndrome. Over the following months he gradually recovered but remained permanently deaf. This harrowing illness may well have had an influence on his later work. It is also quite possible he had a fear of insanity himself because two of his relatives (an aunt and uncle) were affected in this way.” — Alan E. H. Emery, Practical Neurology. June 2008

4 aventures de Reinette et Mirabelle (1987), Eric Rohmer

4 aventures de Reinette et Mirabelle (1987), Eric Rohmer

You are listening to... -

Eric Eberhardt is the creator of youarelistening.toa fantastic experiment in ambient sound and visuals. Taking live streams from police scanners in various US cities, with a backdrop of eerie, Michael Mann-esque streams of neon-lit freeway traffic, and a randomly chosen soundtrack taken from Soundcloud, the site creates an instant and highly compelling dystopian vision.

“To listen to it is to be plugged into the pulse of the city; lost in fragments of someone else’s story. Urgency alternates with frustration and low-level routine; some incidents are reported while others are resolved; and jaywalking tickets are issued in the same breath as lives are lost.”

Schizophrenia in rap music

In psychiatric circles, schizophrenia is considered a serious mental illness that causes delusions, hallucinations, and social withdrawal. But in rap, schizophrenia means something else: a mode of defiance, a boast, or a threat. The term appears frequently when describing competition between rappers. In “Speak Ya Clout,” the duo Gang Starr rhymes that they are “schizophrenic with rhyme plus we’re well organized” as a way of warning that they are “stepping rugged and tough.”

Schizophrenia also enhances claims of competitive violence—in “16 on Death Row,” 2Pac famously warned that, “I’m kind of schizophrenic, I’m in this shit to win it.” Schizophrenia also helps rappers describe collective responses to racism or injustice. In the multi-artist hit “Everything,” Busta Rhymes calls for action by rapping, “Panic and schizophrenic, sylvy-Atlantic / Wrap up your face in ceramic, goddamit we controllin the planet.”…

Yet something much larger than mere sampling is at play in rap’s use of the terms schizophrenia and schizophrenic. Rap lyrics are the latest installments in a political debate that has evolved over the past century (at least) regarding the contested relationships between race, madness, violence, and civil rights… At stake is a series of existential and material questions about the causes, actions, and implications of sanity itself.

Full article here

Sep 28

Karin Bauer - We will find us (Wir werden uns finden) 
Ink on handmade paper, 29x21 cm, 2008

Karin Bauer - We will find us (Wir werden uns finden)

Ink on handmade paper, 29x21 cm, 2008

late night thoughts

Sep 26

danieljamesthawley:

A close up of “1%” by Item Idem (2012). The artwork consists of 12 Comme des Garçons washing tags hidden among 1200 replica tags, stitched into the silhouette of a 1912 man’s frock coat. Currently on display at “Bureau de Change” an exhibition curated by Yang Li & Cyril Duval at LORCA 47 Rue de Lancry 75010 Paris, France.

danieljamesthawley:

A close up of “1%” by Item Idem (2012). The artwork consists of 12 Comme des Garçons washing tags hidden among 1200 replica tags, stitched into the silhouette of a 1912 man’s frock coat. Currently on display at “Bureau de Change” an exhibition curated by Yang Li & Cyril Duval at LORCA 47 Rue de Lancry 75010 Paris, France.

(via cowboybibimbop)

Sep 25

[video]

Sep 24

“We take off into the cosmos, ready for anything: for solitude, for hardship, for exhaustion, death. Modesty forbids us to say so, but there are times when we think pretty well of ourselves. And yet, if we examine it more closely, our enthusiasm turns out to be all a sham. We don’t want to conquer the cosmos, we simply want to extend the boundaries of Earth to the frontiers of the cosmos. For us, such and such a planet is as arid as the Sahara, another as frozen as the North Pole, yet another as lush as the Amazon basin. We are humanitarian and chivalrous; we don’t want to enslave other races, we simply want to bequeath them our values and take over their heritage in exchange. We think of ourselves as the Knights of the Holy Contact. This is another lie. We are only seeking Man. We have no need of other worlds. A single world, our own, suffices us; but we can’t accept it for what it is. We are searching for an ideal image of our own world: we go in quest of a planet, a civilization superior to our own but developed on the basis of a prototype of our primeval past. At the same time, there is something inside us which we don’t like to face up to, from which we try to protect ourselves, but which nevertheless remains, since we don’t leave Earth in a state of primal innocence. We arrive here as we are in reality, and when the page is turned and that reality is revealed to us - that part of our reality which we would prefer to pass over in silence - then we don’t like it anymore.” — Stanisław LemSolaris

“Every great advance in natural knowledge has involved the absolute rejection of authority.” — Thomas H. Huxley

(Source: moonbutterfly, via diamond-mouth)